Open Banking in the Same Language

https://finovate.com/open-banking-in-the-same-language/
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What happens when third party fintechs try to access banking data on behalf of their consumers, but each way has a different way of doing so?

That’s exactly what’s happening in the U.S. right now, and it’s a major factor in preventing the country from adopting an open banking culture. In an era when consumers conduct their banking activities with multiple providers, open banking not only safeguards consumer data but also places them in control of how they want their data used and for how long.

Speaking different languages

The lack of a consistent approach is also the reason why customers of some U.S. banks have been locked out of third party applications such as Robinhood and Digit. While these customers were prevented from using their own banking data, banks had good reason to lock out the third party providers, citing security concerns. Our piece Are U.S. Banks Leaning Towards Closed Banking? covers the drama in more detail.

What’s needed is a standardized regulation for data sharing. Banks can’t trust third parties and what they may do with customer data. With new regulations such as CCPA and GDPR, banks are required to keep track of how their clients’ data is used. Once a third party possesses customer data, the bank can no longer guarantee it will be used and stored properly.

Aligning the approach

So how does the fintech industry get everyone on the same page when it comes to data sharing?

The Financial Data Exchange (FDX) was created to solve that very same problem. “FDX is member-driven and governed by majority vote and we’re united by a common mission and purpose: providing secure and convenient financial data sharing,” said FDX Managing Director Don Cardinal. “Our Working Groups are inclusive, transparent and benefit from our members’ decades of experience and professionalism.”

FDX is a non-profit organization that is creating what is essentially a playbook of data communications rules for banks and third party fintechs. FDX currently counts 102 organizations– only two thirds of which are banks– that vote on an agreed upon global standard for data sharing.

Keeping the end consumer in mind

Importantly, FDX not only helps its member organizations speak the same language, the alignment trickles down to benefit end consumers as well. That’s because FDX helps place consumers in control of their own data, allowing them to decide which organizations can use their data and for how long. Aiding in this transparency, some banks have created dashboards that allow customers to view and edit which apps have access to their data.

To promote more consumer awareness, FDX is working to create a certification stack that would indicate to consumers whether a bank, fintech, or organization is part of FDX. You can think of this similar to a bluetooth logo on a device that informs consumers that a product has undergone the Bluetooth Qualification Program.

So when can we expect mainstream adoption of FDX?

“While we cannot give an exact date, we know from similar innovations (online banking, billpay, mobile banking, EMV chip cards) that we are moving from the Innovator to the Early Adopter stage and that acceleration of adoption will accelerate once we pass the mid-market peak,” said Cardinal. “To date, our members have moved nearly 12 million U.S. consumers over to the FDX API.”

https://finovate.com/open-banking-in-the-same-language/